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How to Paint a Wall: Get Perfect Straight Paint Lines Between Wall Transitions

Do you watch HGTV and admire their perfect paint jobs?

Learning how to paint a wall so that it looks awesome is a savvy skill any homeowner would love.

Great paint jobs are especially noticeable when there are two opposing colors next to each other — like a Halloween orange and earthy neutral.

Hey, wait a minute!!

That’s my dining room and kitchen.  But unfortunately my  paint lines separating the two rooms are less than perfect.

As a matter of fact, they look downright sloppy joe.

The problem is quite apparent yet the solution is somewhat hazy. Remedying paint transitions between different colored walls can be frustrating at best.

Apparently many of us want a pro looking paint job with crisp lines, including myself .  Is there a solution to this problem?

Yes there is my friends!

In today’s session you’ll discover two HUGE tips to get straight paint lines on your walls and have your friends ask how you did it. And yes, HGTV might want some pictures!!

 

How to Paint a Wall and Get Straight Lines -- by Home Repair Tutor
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As you can see from the video, my first attempt at straight lines had bad results. It was mostly the white primer that bled through the Frog Tape.

Yet the second go round resulted in perfectly painted lines between the neutral and orange paint. Crisis avoided between me and my wife.

Frankly, I was sweating the entire time and thinking about how I was going to explain my latest painting blunder.

Make sure you share these awesome tips when someone asks you how to paint a wall the right way. Frog Tape and  silicone caulk – these are essential painting tools.  Just ensure the silicone caulk is clear and paintable.

So, I’d love to know:

Where could you use these new skills in your house? Do you have paint on moldings or ceilings that need to be touched up?

Leave a comment below and let me know.

Thanks as always for dropping in, reading, watching and sharing your great ideas. You rock!

:)

Jeff Patterson

 

 

 

P.S.

I can’t take credit for these awesome tips. You should check out the YouTube channel by B & K Painting. Chris is a pro with tons of cost saving ideas and advice about painting.

 

 

 

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6 comments… add one

  • John @ AZ DIY Guy November 1, 2013, 11:44 PM

    Great post Jeff. Although I am a seasoned Frog Tape veteran, I’ve never used the caulk trick. I’ve heard about it, but never seen it performed. Thanks for a new technique that that I’ll try next time,… when I’m shoved slump-shouldered and whining into a painting project.

    What’s the reasoning for silicone caulk, instead of acrylic?

    John

    • Jeff Patterson November 2, 2013, 7:31 AM

      Painting isn’t my favorite thing to do either John.

      You could give acrylic a shot and see if it works. Just make sure it’s paintable and clear in case you miss painting it. Frog Tape works great on it’s own but paint bleeds through it sometimes when the wall has some major imperfections. Thus, the caulk really helps solve this problem.

  • Bonnie K (BornInaZoo) November 10, 2013, 5:06 PM

    I have two identical archways between between my kitchen/dining room & living room & bedroom in my built in 1907 house. The three rooms are three different colors … but I wanted the archways white like the rest of the trim in my house. I did this same thing, but used the arch color paint to seal the tape.

    Today, my cousin called me & asked how I got such perfect lines on my paint. I told her what I did. She doesn’t have the original base color so it was perfect timing that Hometalk featured this link.

    • Jeff Patterson November 10, 2013, 6:46 PM

      Awesome Bonnie, glad I was able to help you help your cousin. Obviously you’re a great painter!

      Hope you had a fantastic day.

  • Coreen VanDerWoude November 17, 2014, 4:20 PM

    I didn’t understand where the caulk goes. Is it only on the tape to keep it from getting painted? Or does it also go somewhat on the wall to be painted? I tend to be rather OCD on getting directions extremely well understood, so please don’t feel offended that I didn’t get it all. I really appreciate how really well you explain things, and I usually do understand what you’re explaining! But this one I’m not sure of.
    Thanks, Jeff!!!

    • Jeff Patterson November 19, 2014, 6:22 AM

      No problem Coreen. I applied the tape to the wall then added the caulk to the side that needs to be painted. The caulk will overlap the wall and the tape. Then you can paint over the caulk (which should be paintable) and immediately peel the tape off for a clean look. Hope this explains the process a bit more :D

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