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How to Season Replacement Cast Iron Grill Grates

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by Jeff Patterson in Exterior DIY Projects
How to Season Cast Iron Grill Grates

Replacement cast iron grill grates are not cheap.

So how do you prevent them from rusting and turning into a pile of scrap metal?

This was a question I had after realizing our 10-year-old gas grill needed new replacement cast iron grill grates.

Since I was in a rush to get this project done I had to buy Char-Broil grates for our Weber gas grill. And it was somewhat of a bust (which I’ll explain later) but you’ll get some good tips at my expense 🙂

Here are the supplies you need:

  • Replacement cast iron grill grates
  • Crisco
  • Paper towels
  • Microfiber cloth
  • Mild dishwashing soap

After reading this post you’ll have the ability to season new or replacement cast iron grill grates. This in turn will prevent rusting and stop your food from sticking-which is annoying at best!!

I guarantee you’ll discover a few good tips. But if you have your own please don’t hesitate to let me know.

Removing the Protective Wax Coating from New Cast Iron Grill Grates

While shopping at Lowe’s I discovered these cool replacement cast iron grill grates by Char-Broil. They adjust from 14 to 19.5 inches. Which is awesome.

 

How to Season Cast Iron Grill Grates-Char Broil Cast Iron Grill Grates

Although it was hard for me to see it, there was a protective wax coating on the new cast iron grill grates. You’ll have to remove this wax before seasoning the grates.

I used a mild dishwashing soap and hot water to accomplish this task.

How to Season Cast Iron Grill Grates-Use a mild soap to clean off the wax coating

Place the cast iron grill grates in your kitchen sink along with 1 tablespoon of soap. Add enough hot water to soak all the grates.

Let them soak for 10-15 minutes then immediately dry them with a towel.

Why do you want the grates as dry as David Letterman? Oil and water don’t mix.

Any water left on the grates will ruin the seasoning step, which involves Crisco.

 

Cast Iron Grill Grate Seasoning: Crisco and Microfiber Cloths are the Key

Crisco is body moisturizer for cast iron grill grates. You’ll need to apply it to every nook and cranny. A thin coating is all you need.

At first I used paper towels to apply the Crisco and this didn’t work all that well because cast iron isn’t perfectly smooth. Thus, tiny bits of paper would get stuck to the grate.

Then I had an epiphany. Why not use one of the 50 microfiber cloths sitting in our laundry room? We use these to clean around the house and they’re not that expensive, at least the ones we buy at Home Depot.How to Season Cast Iron Grill Grates-Use a microfiber cloth to apply Crisco

 

Here’s a short video that shows you the grill grates and how to season them. I’ll reveal my big mistake, and although I’m a bit embarrassed it’s better that I share my big goof so you don’t do the same thing.

 

What’s Next

Our tutorial showing how to revamp a stone patio also comes in handy if that’s where your grill is stored!!

Also, grab our free guide if you’re doing a DIY bathroom remodel – it shares how to remodel a bathroom in 10 days or less

Send Me The Guide

 

Cheers,

Jeff Patterson

 

 

5 Comments
  1. Roeshel says:

    Interesting, Jeff! I never would have even thought about that. I think ours is porcelain coated. Confession: I’ve never used the grill. My husband does it all {even in the snow}. Pinning for future reference…he does like cast iron. I’ll have to see if they make them for his grill (future gift idea!). Thanks!

    1. Is your husband for hire (Lol)!!

      Don’t make the same mistake as me with the grill grates, I should have waited and bought the Weber brand.

      Or I could learn to use a tape measure since the grates don’t fit our grill. Hope you had a great New Year Roeshel 🙂

  2. Chris says:

    You may be able to save your old grates if you haven’t already disposed of them or if they are too broken down to reuse. Line your oven shelves with aluminum foil and place the grates on the foil.

    Close the door and set the oven to self-clean and run it through the long cycle. After the cycle is complete and the grates are cool, you will see that most of the crust has burned off. There will usually be a bit of rust on them as well.

    Use a steel wool pad to clean them up and you will see that they look very much like they did when they were new. Then go ahead with the seasoning the way you instructed.

    I also use this with cast iron pots and pans. Because it can be a little stinky, I have actually used my Weber charcoal grill with a ton of coals to burn them off. I have photos of the process I used on a particularly nasty dutch oven if you are interested.
    -Chris

    1. These are fantastic tips Chris. Anyone who has newer or salvageable grates should totally give your process a try.

      I’d be super interested in seeing the pics from the dutch oven process. If you don’t mind go ahead and send them to [email protected]. Add a few comments to help me learn a bit more about this method.

      I’m excited to see your ideas 🙂

  3. LoraA says:

    Thanks for the article and the video! Really helpful

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